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(740) 622-8400

Coshocton, OH

November 2023

Tuesday, 28 November 2023 00:00

What Is Skew Foot?

Skew foot, also known as serpentine foot, is a complex foot deformity often identified at birth or in childhood. It is characterized by a combination of abnormalities that affect the alignment and function of the foot. This condition involves a combination of forefoot abduction, where the front part of the foot turns outward, and hindfoot varus, where the heel turns inward. These alterations lead to a zigzag appearance of the foot, hence the name skew foot. Individuals with skew foot may experience difficulties in walking, balance, and may have discomfort or pain due to the abnormal pressure distribution on the foot. Treatment options vary depending on the severity and underlying cause of the condition. Conservative management includes wearing orthotic devices and special footwear to support and realign the foot. In more severe cases, surgical intervention may be required to correct the deformity and improve function. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential in preventing progression and maintaining mobility and quality of life. If your child has what appears to be skew foot, it is strongly suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible for treatment.

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Tupper of Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 21 November 2023 00:00

Causes and Signs of Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails, a discomfort that can disrupt the rhythm of your daily life, often stem from a combination of factors. The primary cause lies in the toenail's edge growing into the surrounding skin, triggering inflammation and pain. Improper toenail trimming, wearing tight shoes, or sustaining injuries to the toe can contribute to this unwelcome development. Recognizing the signs of an ingrown toenail is vital for timely intervention. Persistent pain, redness, and swelling around the toenail, coupled with potential drainage of pus, signify the onset. If left untreated, ingrown toenails can escalate into infections, posing greater challenges. Understanding the causes and recognizing early signs empowers individuals to address ingrown toenails promptly, restoring comfort and preserving the health of their feet. Ingrown toenails can be a serious foot condition. If you have symptoms of this ailment, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can offer you correct treatment options.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Tupper of Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 14 November 2023 00:00

Definition and Causes of Poor Foot Circulation

Poor circulation in the feet refers to a condition where blood flow to the lower extremities is insufficient, resulting in various discomforts and potential health issues. It occurs when blood struggles to move freely through the blood vessels, leading to a lack of oxygen and nutrients in the feet. Several factors can contribute to poor circulation in the feet. One primary cause is atherosclerosis, where fatty deposits build up in the arteries, narrowing and hardening them. Diabetes can also lead to circulatory problems, damaging blood vessels and nerves in the feet. Blood clot formation, often in deep veins, which is known as deep vein thrombosis, also can obstruct circulation. Smoking, high blood pressure, and obesity are additional risk factors. Symptoms of poor circulation in the feet can range from tingling, numbness, and coldness to more severe complications such as ulcers and non-healing wounds. Early detection and proactive measures to improve circulation and maintain foot health can help. If you have symptoms of poor foot circulation, it is strongly suggested that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can determine the cause and offer appropriate treatment options.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Tupper of Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Published in Blog
Sunday, 12 November 2023 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Published in Blog

Flat feet, a common condition in adults, occurs when the arches of the feet collapse, causing the entire sole to touch the ground. This condition typically advances through several stages, each with its own set of symptoms. In the early stages, some individuals may not experience any discomfort or issues, while others may feel mild pain or fatigue after prolonged standing or physical activity. As flat feet progress, the discomfort can intensify, spreading to the ankles, knees, and lower back. This can result in reduced mobility and chronic pain. In severe cases, the arch completely flattens, and the foot loses flexibility, leading to a more pronounced disability. Recognizing the stages of flat feet is important for appropriate management, as early intervention can bring various choices of treatment to choose from. If you have flat feet, it is suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can guide you toward appropriate relief methods.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Tupper from Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Flatfoot
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