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(740) 622-8400

Coshocton, OH

Tuesday, 25 January 2022 00:00

The presence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage) and peripheral artery disease (poor circulation) in many diabetic patients creates a perfect storm of factors that can make wounds difficult to detect and take longer to heal. Chronic wounds that don’t heal (ulcers) are potentially very dangerous to both the overall health of the patient as well as their affected limb. There are eight steps every diabetic should take to help prevent such ulcers: 1) check your feet daily for cuts, growths or red spots, 2) wash and thoroughly dry your feet every day, 3) moisturize your feet, except between the toes, 4) trim your toenails straight across, but not too short, 5) avoid walking barefoot, and wear shoes that fit well, 6) protect your feet from extreme heat or cold, 7) elevate your feet as much as possible when sitting, and exercise your toes and ankles to aid circulation, and 8) have a podiatrist examine your feet at least once a year.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Tupper from Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Thursday, 20 January 2022 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

Sometimes a bony lump forms on the back of the heel, commonly referred to as a pump bump. It may be caused by the rubbing of your heel on the inside of the shoe. Activity can aggravate the bumps, which normally form on both heels and sometimes lead to pain. Wearing shoes with no heel can increase your comfort level but will not reduce or affect the lump itself. A podiatrist can take an X-ray of the area to determine its severity and suggest non-surgical or surgical treatment options as needed. One such remedy is a change in footwear to a more softly cushioned heel counter, which can help to alleviate any pain or swelling in the area. Further, a heel insert may help alleviate discomfort. If the pump bump continues to enlarge and becomes painful enough to interfere with your daily activities, a podiatrist can also recommend remedies that will help bring relief.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Tupper of Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Feet are a complex collection of bones, joints, and ligaments that takes years to develop fully. Most babies are born with flat feet, but this improves in the first few years of growth, as their bones develop and their muscles get stronger. By around six years of age, arch development is generally normal. When babies are learning to walk, they often turn their toes inward (in-toeing) until the muscles and ligaments develop. This can come from the foot, lower leg or upper leg. Occasionally, toddlers turn their toes outward (out-toeing) when they walk and run. This usually resolves itself as their posture and balance mature. If your child complains of pain, if their in-toeing or out-toeing does not improve or worsens, or if the condition affects only one side of the body, it may be wise to seek the expertise of a podiatrist for a full exam and prognosis. Additionally, if your child limps, trips frequently, develops bunions or ingrown toenails, or has abnormally shaped toes, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for further examination.

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact Dr. Tupper of Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Do to Keep Your Child’s Feet Healthy
Coshocton Office
 
1529 Walnut St
Coshocton, OH 43812

(740) 622-8400

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