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Tuesday, 27 July 2021 00:00

Broken ankles occur when any one of the bones in the ankle joint either fracture. The bones in the ankle joint include the tibia (shin bone), the fibula (back of the ankle), and the talus (the small bone between the heel bone and the tibia and fibula). Signs of a broken ankle include swelling, pain, bruising, tenderness, inability to bear weight, and an inability to walk on the affected leg. It can be difficult to tell the difference between a sprained ankle and a broken ankle. Sprains occur when the ligaments connecting the bone are torn. Patients who have injured their ankle and believe that it is sprained or fractured should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis. A podiatrist can use a variety of methods that include physical examination, an X-ray, or even a CT or MRI scan to determine the cause of your ankle pain. 

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Tupper from Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankles
Saturday, 24 July 2021 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

The cuboid is a cube-shaped bone located in the middle of your foot. This bone can become injured or dislocated following an injury to the foot. People who play sports that put a lot of stress on the feet and people with notable overpronation of the feet are said to have an increased risk for developing this condition. The most common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain and weakness in the affected foot, particularly when bearing weight. The foot may also be swollen, tender, or red. These symptoms can be severe enough to make walking or standing difficult, sometimes causing a limp, and interfering with daily activities. Symptoms can also have a sudden or gradual onset. If your foot is showing any signs or symptoms of cuboid syndrome, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Tupper from Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about All About Cuboid Syndrome
Tuesday, 13 July 2021 00:00

A neuroma is a condition where the tissue that surrounds a nerve becomes thickened and inflamed. A neuroma can materialize around any nerve of the body, but when it occurs between the 3rd and 4th toes (or less commonly the 2nd and 3rd toes), it is known as Morton’s Neuroma. This benign growth of nerve cells can cause tingling, pain, and numbness in the ball of the foot—often making it feel as if there is a pebble stuck in your shoe. It is suggested that you see a podiatrist if you suspect you have Mortaon’s neuroma, as the condition may worsen and possibly lead to permanent nerve damage.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Tupper of Coshocton Foot Health Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Coshocton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
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